All posts for Tag: interactive film

Congratulations to Guest Speaker Dawid Marcinkowski for his Webby Nom!

You may remember when we welcomed Dawid Marcinkowski into the lab for our last session to talk about his work in interactive cinema.   Now, we are proud to announce that Sufferrosa has been nominated for the Best Experimental Movie in the 15th Annual Webby Awards which honour excellence on the internet.

You are all encouraged to vote for his amazing work at: http://webby.aol.com/media_types/online-film-and-video?focused_on_category=907#cat_id_907

Best of luck to Dawid!

CFC Media Lab Welcomes International Guest Director

Last week we had the absolute pleasure of introducing International Guest Director, Dawid Marcinkowski (Director/Screenwriter/Editor/Designer), to our current Residents of the TELUS Interactive Art & Entertainment Program*.

What began with screenings of his online interactive music videos Smolik Attitude (www.nobudget.art.pl) and Someday on the Misty Island (www.dawidmarcinkowski.com/mistyisland) as well as his interactive film Sufferosa (sufferrosa.com) at TIFF Bell Lightbox, ended with a reveal of his process as an interactive filmmaker during the post-screening Q&A with our Residents and CFC Media Lab Guest Faculty member, Todd Denis, Founder/Editor of jawbone.tv.

Sufferrosa is one of the biggest interactive web-based movies ever made (110 scenes, 3 alternative endings, and 20 different locations!) The film is a satire of cult, beauty and youth in the present-day world.

Do you remember the film ‘Logan’s Run’ (1976), where everybody who is older than 30 gets exterminated? Probably our generation is not endangered by such experiments. But there is a chance that, in 40 years time we will all have transformed into frustrated woopies (Well-Off Older People) who spend their life savings on plastic surgery. And when it happens that the scalpel is not enough, we will probably head directly to the clinic of Carlos von Braun. As Mae West once said “You are never too old to become younger”…

EXPLORE IT ONLINE NOW…

TELUS IAEP

*Interested in being part of the next TELUS Interactive Art & Entertainment Program at the CFC Media Lab? We’re now accepting RSVP’s for our TELUS IAEP Spring 2011 Info Session on November 17th at 6:30pm in Downtown Toronto. Please RSVP to medialab@cfccreates.com to be forwarded the location details.

The deadline for TELUS IAEP Spring 2011 applications is DECEMBER 15, 2010. For more information, check out www.cfccreates.com/what_we_do/cfc_media_lab/telus_interactive_art_and_entertainment_program

5th Annual Content 360 Challenge at MIPTV 2010

content3601

ATTENTION ALL DIGITAL DAREDEVILS!

The most anticipated cross-media pitching challenge of the new decade has begun accepting entries for new ideas and techniques to engage audiences across digital platforms.

Finalists including independent producers, interactive agencies and digital designers will be invited to Cannes, France (April 12-16) to pitch ideas LIVE to major international networks, including the BBC, TF1, KCC, NFB, and the European Commission.

This rapid-fire competition sets the creative pulse for the Content 360 Festival, part of MIPTV’s all-new MIPDigital event programme.

Since its launch 4 years ago, the Content 360 Challenge has attracted over 1400 new ideas from 42 countries and awarded €400,000 in development funding.

Category: CONTENT 360 “Next Generation Audience Engagement”. A creative challenge for new talent, companies or freelancers, with truly new and unique application or content ideas with mass potential to attract and engage audiences.

Category: KOREA COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (KCC) “Engaging with children through the use of Connected TV”. Best educational content or service idea to engage with children through Wed TV, DMB and IPTV including any kind of connected TV.

Category: NATIONAL FILM BOARD OF CANADA (NFB) – “Next Generation Online Video Experience”. The National Film Board of Canada is on the lookout for the best and brightest to push the online video experience to a whole new level and imagine the next “killer feature” for the NFB.ca website.

Category: TF1 PUBLICITÉ – “New Advertising formats”. TF1 Publicité is looking for new advertising formats and/or cross media techniques to complement TV campaigns (TV commercials, billboards or short form programs) in order to maximize the efficiency of traditional TV advertising methods.

DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES: February 15, 2010.

European Commission Challenge details.

For more information on “Content 360 – MIPTV Cross Media Challenge” visit here or contact content360@reedmidem.com.


The Banff New Media Institute, Zero1, Sundance Institute partner on Locative Cinema commission

This looks like an amazing opportunity especially for those of you that are super excited by place, space and site specific projects. And they’ll even give you money to do it!

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For more information on Locative Cinema Commission:
http://www.banffcentre.ca/bnmi/news/archive/2009/international-commissioning.asp

For more information the Banff New Media Institute at The Banff Centre:
http://www.banffcentre.ca/bnmi/

Media Contacts:
Doniece Sandoval, Chief External Relations Officer, ZERO1: The Art and Technology Network
Doniece@zero1.org • 415.846.4988

Brooks Addicott, Associate Director, Media Relations, Sundance Institute
brooks_addicott@sundance.org • 435.658.3456

Jill Sawyer, Media & Communications Officer, The Banff Centre
jill_sawyer@banffcentre.ca • 403.762.6475

post init updates

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init was lovely, interesting, engaging etc… but don’t just take my word for it:

Live cinema, epic theatre

I’ve meaning to get this blog written for a week, but my real job kept getting in the way. Last weekend I spend about 14 hours consuming art, or rather being consumed by it. I’m still blathering about the experience to whoever will listen, sounding like a crazy person. It’s hard to convey. Last Saturday night I went to a “live cinema” party in a warehouse down near the waterfront. Called Init—”an immersive audio visual experience”— was like the digital era’s version of a ’60s happening. It began outdoors with fire dancers twirling ropes of flame to a vast samba band. Then, in the warehouse, VJs at computer consoles live-mixed a wild array of video, projected around the white cinder-block walls from all angles, while a DJ laid down a heavy pulse of house music. Like the audio, the visuals were looped and overlaid in trance-like beats, images morphing in and out of each other in rhythmic respiration. But it wasn’t a blitz of fast-cutting. These were movies you could dance to, or dream to, and people did, until 4 a.m. The event was not part of Luminato, but it should have been.

The next day, Sunday, I spent almost nine hours immersed in Robert Lepage’s marathon play, Lipsynch, at the Bluma Appel Theatre, which was part of Luminato. You tell people you’ve just spent nine hours watching a play conducted in four languages (with projected sur-titles) and they think you’ve undergone an endurance test, made a heroic sacrifice for art. On the contrary. There was no suffering. The time flew by. It was like taking your brain on a luxurious cruise. Or It spending the day in an art spa, basking in mind massages and sensory wraps. Maybe it was high art but the ascent was effortless: because Lepage did all the work for you, it was experienced as pure entertainment. The intermissions were generous, and you’d chat with friends, fellow travellers, while watching the strange tent city of Woofstock—a dog festival on Front St.—through the theatre’s glass front.

When the play was over, I came out of the theatre exhilarated and refreshed, I realized I’d been treated to one of most breathtaking theatrical events I’ve ever witnessed. I use the word “theatrical” with some hesitation, because it transcended theatre. With natural acting, miraculous staging, operatic arias and a soap-opera plot you could get lost in, Lipsynch was like watching TV or film in the flesh.

It was another kind of live cinema—and not just because Lepage used video projections. The staging had the epic complexity of a movie set that was constantly being erected and broken down. For some scenes it actually was a film set—as we watched the shooting of a movie that fictionalized the story that had just unfolded. Throughout the play, scenes cut and dissolved in and out of each other with cinematic sleight of hand. The transformations were executed with a modular triptych of large, rolling rectangular panels—like 3D movie screens deep enough to serve as rooms with live actors. These epic yet elegant constructions must have been converted into some 50 or 60 sets. A cross-section of a passenger jet stretched the width of the stage. We’d watch a scene unfold in a bookstore, not knowing To see them materialize out of each other was like seeing the mechanics of editing animated on a macroscopic scale. You watch characters having a series of conversations a bookstore, from outside the window, then Lepage turns the scene inside-out, and rolls the same scene from inside the store. One minute you’re in a living room, listening to the BBC, then you’re whisked down the rabbit hole into the BBC studio itself, and then into the soap-opera life of the announcer. And so on . . .

Despite the visual virtuosity, Lipsynch was really about sound. About voice. One of the central characters is an Austrian opera singer played by American soprano Rebecca Blankenship. And some of the key sequences involved a dubbing studio, created with utter realism, where actors synched dialogue to scenes projected on film. So three dimensions were being played out simultaneously on stage—the scene on film, the actor overdubbing the dialogue, and the characters in the control booth, who talk about him without him hearing. And did I mention that this play was often hysterically funny? Lepage may be one of theatre’s most avant-garde innovators, but he’s not too above building a farcical climax out of an extended fart gag. I won’t even begin to describe the plot, which was more expansive than Babel, or list the actors. This is not a review. I’m happy to say I was not on assignment last Sunday. I paid for the pair of $100 tickets out of my own pocket, and it was worth every dime.

The previous night’s semi-underground warehouse rave of live cinema was also an off-duty affair, and worth the $20 that bought me a wristband. The VJs included noted Canadian filmmaker Peter Mettler (Gambling, Gods and LSD), German live cinema guru FaLk—and Brian T. Moore, the local live cinema enthusiast who organized the event. There was also a remarkable dance performance by Andrea Nann and two male partners (Brendan Wyatt and Yuichiro Inoue), a noir ménage-a-trois that was executed outside, on a dimly lit loading dock of the warehouse. That afternoon, just down the street at the Young Centre, I’d seen Andrea perform three of her Divination Duets with Wyatt. My favorite was Insomnia, which involved the two of them in pajamas, as a couple in bed, him asleep, her awake and trying to get comfortable under his dead weight as they half-rolled, half wrestled around the floor in contortions of unconscious desire and unvoiced frustration.

Sometimes the best movies are found outside the cinema.

http://www2.macleans.ca/2009/06/20/live-cinema-epic-theatre/

Experience Late Fragment at the NFB CINEMA

Explore & Interact with the film at the NFB Cinema Faye, Kevin and Theo – three troubled strangers, three lives fractured by thoughts and acts of violence.  In the interactive feature film Late Fragment, their narratives interlock in a unique cinematic experience.

FOR ONE NIGHT ONLY GET 25% OFF THE DVD BUY YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE – LIMITED SEATING Friday, October 3 at 8 PM – Special Presentation

Play a creative and interactive role by navigating through the movie controlling the flow and direction of the elaborate sequence of events with a simple click.  Audience interaction, followed by a panel discussion on the making of an interactive film with Mateo Guez (director), Anita Lee (producer) Roslyn Kalloo (editor) and Tina Santiago (line producer).

RATED 18 + $6 | $4 students, seniors, NFB, DOC members 150 John street (corner Richmond) For more information 416.973.3012

www.nfb.ca/mediatheque

www.latefragment.com

Late Fragment DVD Release Party

LateFragment DVD Release Party

CFC Media Lab Welcomes International Guest Director

Last week we had the absolute pleasure of introducing International Guest Director, Dawid Marcinkowski (Director/Screenwriter/Editor/Designer), to our current Residents of the TELUS Interactive Art & Entertainment Program*. What began with screenings of his online interactive music videos Smolik Attitude (www.nobudget.art.pl) and Someday on the Misty Island (www.dawidmarcinkowski.com/mistyisland) as well as his interactive film Sufferosa (sufferrosa.com) […]

5th Annual Content 360 Challenge at MIPTV 2010

ATTENTION ALL DIGITAL DAREDEVILS! The most anticipated cross-media pitching challenge of the new decade has begun accepting entries for new ideas and techniques to engage audiences across digital platforms. Finalists including independent producers, interactive agencies and digital designers will be invited to Cannes, France (April 12-16) to pitch ideas LIVE to major international networks, including […]

The Banff New Media Institute, Zero1, Sundance Institute partner on Locative Cinema commission

This looks like an amazing opportunity especially for those of you that are super excited by place, space and site specific projects. And they’ll even give you money to do it! For more information on Locative Cinema Commission: http://www.banffcentre.ca/bnmi/news/archive/2009/international-commissioning.asp For more information the Banff New Media Institute at The Banff Centre: http://www.banffcentre.ca/bnmi/ Media Contacts: Doniece […]

post init updates

init was lovely, interesting, engaging etc… but don’t just take my word for it: Live cinema, epic theatre I’ve meaning to get this blog written for a week, but my real job kept getting in the way. Last weekend I spend about 14 hours consuming art, or rather being consumed by it. I’m still blathering […]

Experience Late Fragment at the NFB CINEMA

Explore & Interact with the film at the NFB Cinema Faye, Kevin and Theo – three troubled strangers, three lives fractured by thoughts and acts of violence.  In the interactive feature film Late Fragment, their narratives interlock in a unique cinematic experience. FOR ONE NIGHT ONLY GET 25% OFF THE DVD BUY YOUR TICKETS IN […]

Late Fragment DVD Release Party

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