All posts for Tag: interactive screen

CFC Media Lab Alumnus Launches Interactive Docu-drama Ft. D-Day Vets

CFC Media Lab Alumnus Launches Interactive Docu-drama Ft. D-Day Vets:
In time for this year’s Remembrance Day, Storming Juno, interactive docu-drama featuring real life stories of Juno Beach D-Day Vets, was launched by Secret Location, Windup Filmworks and Shaw Media with History Television Canada*

The interactive web component of Storming Juno was created by Secret Location’s Executive Producer/Writer and CFC Media Lab Alumnus, James Milward.

Worth the click!

For the full ReelScreen article, visit: www.realscreen.com/articles/news/20101110/stormingjuno

*Storming Juno featured today on history.ca!

CFC Media Lab Alumnus to Exhibit Interactive Photo Montage at Nuit Blanche, Montreal

dismoi

CFC Media Lab Alumnus, Genevieve Godin, is exhibiting an interactive photo montage “Dis-moi” at Nuit Blanche a Montreal on Saturday, February 27, 2010 from 9pm – 3am.

This free exhibit invites the spectators to take part in the creation and the transformation of the digital images and photo montage. It will be created live and will feature the All-Nighter audience as its main character. 

More info here.

BNMI Announces Upcoming Programs

bnmiprograms2

The Banff New Media Institute is offering the following exciting programs:

  • Video 2.0: Do-it-yourself videos and social media marketing

Program dates: March 4 – 7, 2010

  • Interactive Screen 1.0: Beautiful Lives

Program dates: August 14 – 21, 2010

  • Self-directed Co-production Residencies

If interested, contact: 1-403-762-6180 or email arts_info@banffcentre.ca

For more BNMI program information click here or visit the BNMI website.

World Without Water Exhibits at CODE Live

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CFC Media Lab Alumni, Tahir Mahmood, Kalli Paakspuu, and Suzette Araujo exhibit “World Without Water” at VANOC’s CODE Live (Cultural Olympiad Digital Edition), a festival celebrating Canadian culture and talent into the digital sphere running February 4-21, 2010. World Without Water will be exhibited at Great Northern Way Campus (577 Great Northern Way, Vancouver) as part of the Eco-Art series, co-presented with the Canadian Film Centre.

Through a physical interaction in a bathroom vanity, World Without Water offers a new media interactive documentary experience that witnesses the world’s diminishing fresh water supply.

The banal act of walking into a private bathroom and turning on the faucet while looking into a mirror, is the framework for a meditation on the future of this precious resource – water.

By turning on the tap we see photos streamed from the website flickr.com in the mirror.  Tagged flickr images reflect a global public’s view on the absence and abundance of fresh water. If both taps are turned the user is invited into an associational play with the “hot” (absence) and “cold” (abundance) images that have been uploaded from all across the world by professional and amateur photographers and made available through a live internet connection.

The user, while washing, makes narratives from views of our water use from Eurasia to Africa and from Australia to the Badlands of North America in a fun, clean and exploratory experience.

Artist Biographies:

Tahir Mahmood is a multi-talented creative personality with a Bachelors degree in Graphic Design. His career has spanned the last decade working as an Art Director and Set Designer for numerous music videos, documentary productions and TV commercials, including Art Direction for the Mountain Dew Survivor Reality Show for Castaway Production USA. Tahir co-founded World Without Water during his time at the Canadian Film Center’s Interactive Art and Entertainment Program in 2007.

Kalli Paakspuu is a founder of the nonprofits Womenfilm/Womenart and Collective for Living Theatre as well as a Genie-winning filmmaker. She expects to defend her doctoral dissertation, “Rhetoric’s of Colonialism in Visual Documentation” at the University of Toronto this summer.  The thesis examines early colonial cross-cultural photographic practices and the dialogical storytelling on both sides of the camera as international mediations.  Part-time faculty at York University, she currently teaches cultural studies and has taught film production and screenwriting in the Fine Arts programmes.

Suzette Araujo‘s acting, comedic and musical talents have been showcased in a diverse range of performances, including a two-year North American tour with Cirque du Soleil, shows in China with Theatre Beyond Words, A Ross Petty production of Snow White at the Elgin Theatre in Toronto, and a guest role as Mrs. Chintro in CBC television production of Twitch City. Her original one-woman show, Chandeleirva, won Patron’s Pick Award at the Toronto fringe and was first runner up for the Quincy Award in the Montreal fringe festival.  She performed this show at the Fringe Theatre Festival in New York in August, 2008.

Visit World Without Water.
Visit CODE Live for full event details.

Seed Exhibits at CODE Live

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CFC Media Lab Alumni, Gabe Sawhney and Napo Brousseau, along with former CFC Research and Technology Manager, Galen Scorer, exhibit “Seed” at VANOC’s CODE Live (Cultural Olympiad Digital Edition), a festival celebrating Canadian culture and talent into the digital sphere running February 4-21, 2010. Seed will be exhibited at Great Northern Way Campus (577 Great Northern Way, Vancouver) as part of the Eco-Art series, co-presented with the Canadian Film Centre.

Through the use of sound and imagery, users create and populate a forest together, by dialing a particular number on the screen, each participant receives a  “seed” on the public screen.

Seed explores the convergence of rich media and wireless technology in the creation of a collaborative and evolving work of art. Through sound and imagery, users create and populate a forest together. By dialing a particular number on the screen, each participant receives a  “seed” on the public screen. By using the keypad on the cell phone audiences have the ability to grow their seeds, choose the type of trees they want to plant, and change their texture and color.

Seed was presented in 2005 at the Scope Art Fair in NYC and has been shown in Australia, China, Canada and the USA.

Artist Biographies:

Napo Brousseau (Founder, Project Director) makes art as a constantly evolving social tool for exploring, stimulating and creating cultural transformation. Brousseau’s mediums include installations; new media; conceptual art, Digital Portraits; miniature water colours created in India; androgynous oil paintings; charcoal drawings; the landmark ants on the Cameron House in Toronto 1984; prop designs for the Pee Wee Herman TV show, New York.
After graduating from the Canadian Film Centre’s New Media Program in 2001, Brousseau Art Directed the “Swamp”, which holds the distinction of being the first cell phone driven interactive narrative. In 2004, he Directed “Emmersive Gallery”, a new media gallery. And in 2005 he was Artistic Director of “The Josh Lederman Art House” a monthly new media, art performance, which was presented online on PerformanceArtTV.com.

Gabe Sawhney (Wireless Director) is a hacker working at the edges of code and culture. At the CFC Media Lab in 2002, Gabe co-created [murmur], an audio storytelling and archival project, using mobile phones and first-person narratives to share location-specific stories, which would otherwise be lost. [murmur] launched in Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal over 2003 and has been featured at numerous festivals and conferences around the world.
Gabe’s recent projects focus on locative media, as well as video and kinetic interactive installation projects. With an academic background in architecture, film and semiotics, Gabe balances an understanding of technology with a passionate interest in visual design, usability and information architecture.

Galen Scorer (Integration Director) was a former Research and Technology Manager as well as advisor on all prototypes and projects developed at the CFC Media Lab. He has worked independently for five years on a broad range of commercial projects including web design, programming, interactive museum exhibits and as an advisor and collaborator to several media artists.
He has taught in many capacities at Ryerson University and Ontario College of Art and Design. He has worked with numerous professors to teach students creative and practical uses of technology in art, design, and programming.  By situating the body in reference to our environment through Net-worked and digital technologies, he investigates the blurring lines of virtual and physical landscapes and the ways in which our bodies inhabit those spaces. In order to explore these ideas he helped form a Research group at Ryerson University called Synth /ops, which investigates artistic uses of broadband networks


Visit Seed.
Visit CODE Live for full event details.

Urban Screens Calls for Submissions

urbanscreen

The exhibition I am here; what can we do? is part of “Urban Screens Toronto 2010”, an international urban screens conference and exhibition taking place between
September 24th-30th
; produced in collaboration with the International Urban Screens Association (IUSA).

Through an integrated program of keynote lectures, panel sessions, workshops, curated screenings and multimedia projects, (Urban Screens Toronto) will bring together leading Canadian and international artists and curators, architects and urban planners, designers, ad agencies and brand managers, screen operators and content providers, academics, activists, policymakers, technology manufacturers, software developers and public intellectuals.

Public Call For Submissions:

  • New or existing experimental, interactive artwork suitable for urban screens.
  • Short-format videos that are relevant for presentation on urban screens.
  • Interactive Design & advertising created for urban screens (past commercial interactive work from ad agencies and designers accepted).
  • Student work interactive and video work by students at any institution worldwide is welcome.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: MARCH 1, 2010

Visit here for full details, suggested themes, and submission format/requirements.

post init updates

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init was lovely, interesting, engaging etc… but don’t just take my word for it:

Live cinema, epic theatre

I’ve meaning to get this blog written for a week, but my real job kept getting in the way. Last weekend I spend about 14 hours consuming art, or rather being consumed by it. I’m still blathering about the experience to whoever will listen, sounding like a crazy person. It’s hard to convey. Last Saturday night I went to a “live cinema” party in a warehouse down near the waterfront. Called Init—”an immersive audio visual experience”— was like the digital era’s version of a ’60s happening. It began outdoors with fire dancers twirling ropes of flame to a vast samba band. Then, in the warehouse, VJs at computer consoles live-mixed a wild array of video, projected around the white cinder-block walls from all angles, while a DJ laid down a heavy pulse of house music. Like the audio, the visuals were looped and overlaid in trance-like beats, images morphing in and out of each other in rhythmic respiration. But it wasn’t a blitz of fast-cutting. These were movies you could dance to, or dream to, and people did, until 4 a.m. The event was not part of Luminato, but it should have been.

The next day, Sunday, I spent almost nine hours immersed in Robert Lepage’s marathon play, Lipsynch, at the Bluma Appel Theatre, which was part of Luminato. You tell people you’ve just spent nine hours watching a play conducted in four languages (with projected sur-titles) and they think you’ve undergone an endurance test, made a heroic sacrifice for art. On the contrary. There was no suffering. The time flew by. It was like taking your brain on a luxurious cruise. Or It spending the day in an art spa, basking in mind massages and sensory wraps. Maybe it was high art but the ascent was effortless: because Lepage did all the work for you, it was experienced as pure entertainment. The intermissions were generous, and you’d chat with friends, fellow travellers, while watching the strange tent city of Woofstock—a dog festival on Front St.—through the theatre’s glass front.

When the play was over, I came out of the theatre exhilarated and refreshed, I realized I’d been treated to one of most breathtaking theatrical events I’ve ever witnessed. I use the word “theatrical” with some hesitation, because it transcended theatre. With natural acting, miraculous staging, operatic arias and a soap-opera plot you could get lost in, Lipsynch was like watching TV or film in the flesh.

It was another kind of live cinema—and not just because Lepage used video projections. The staging had the epic complexity of a movie set that was constantly being erected and broken down. For some scenes it actually was a film set—as we watched the shooting of a movie that fictionalized the story that had just unfolded. Throughout the play, scenes cut and dissolved in and out of each other with cinematic sleight of hand. The transformations were executed with a modular triptych of large, rolling rectangular panels—like 3D movie screens deep enough to serve as rooms with live actors. These epic yet elegant constructions must have been converted into some 50 or 60 sets. A cross-section of a passenger jet stretched the width of the stage. We’d watch a scene unfold in a bookstore, not knowing To see them materialize out of each other was like seeing the mechanics of editing animated on a macroscopic scale. You watch characters having a series of conversations a bookstore, from outside the window, then Lepage turns the scene inside-out, and rolls the same scene from inside the store. One minute you’re in a living room, listening to the BBC, then you’re whisked down the rabbit hole into the BBC studio itself, and then into the soap-opera life of the announcer. And so on . . .

Despite the visual virtuosity, Lipsynch was really about sound. About voice. One of the central characters is an Austrian opera singer played by American soprano Rebecca Blankenship. And some of the key sequences involved a dubbing studio, created with utter realism, where actors synched dialogue to scenes projected on film. So three dimensions were being played out simultaneously on stage—the scene on film, the actor overdubbing the dialogue, and the characters in the control booth, who talk about him without him hearing. And did I mention that this play was often hysterically funny? Lepage may be one of theatre’s most avant-garde innovators, but he’s not too above building a farcical climax out of an extended fart gag. I won’t even begin to describe the plot, which was more expansive than Babel, or list the actors. This is not a review. I’m happy to say I was not on assignment last Sunday. I paid for the pair of $100 tickets out of my own pocket, and it was worth every dime.

The previous night’s semi-underground warehouse rave of live cinema was also an off-duty affair, and worth the $20 that bought me a wristband. The VJs included noted Canadian filmmaker Peter Mettler (Gambling, Gods and LSD), German live cinema guru FaLk—and Brian T. Moore, the local live cinema enthusiast who organized the event. There was also a remarkable dance performance by Andrea Nann and two male partners (Brendan Wyatt and Yuichiro Inoue), a noir ménage-a-trois that was executed outside, on a dimly lit loading dock of the warehouse. That afternoon, just down the street at the Young Centre, I’d seen Andrea perform three of her Divination Duets with Wyatt. My favorite was Insomnia, which involved the two of them in pajamas, as a couple in bed, him asleep, her awake and trying to get comfortable under his dead weight as they half-rolled, half wrestled around the floor in contortions of unconscious desire and unvoiced frustration.

Sometimes the best movies are found outside the cinema.

http://www2.macleans.ca/2009/06/20/live-cinema-epic-theatre/

*NEW* TUFF $2500 prize for emerging filmmakers, sponsored by the City of Toronto

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CFC Media Lab Alumni Sharon Switzer founded this amazing film festival which continues to grow and attract a high level of talented filmmakers.

TORONTO URBAN FILM FESTIVAL
Silent 1-Minute Films on the TTC

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: JULY 15, 2009
Trinity Square Video Pitch Deadline: June 15, 2009

Share your film with an audience of 1.3 million daily commuters. Finalists selected by a stellar panel of guest jurors, with top prizes awarded by this year’s guest judge, writer/director/actor Don McKellar.

ABOUT TUFF:
The Toronto Urban Film Festival (TUFF) is the only film festival of its kind in North America, and one of the largest in the world with an average daily viewing audience of over 1 million. The 3rd annual TUFF is programmed on the Onestop Network of 270 subway platforms screens throughout the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC). We accept all genres of film, video, and animation from both professional and amateur filmmakers. All films screened are silent and 1-minute in length. TUFF is free to enter and open to both Canadian and international submissions.

2009 SUBMISSION CATEGORIES: Urban Diversity – Urban Encounters – Urban Ideas – Urban Imaginary – Urban Journeys – Urban Natural – Urban Secrets

AWARDS:
1ST PLACE – 4.5 star trip for two to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic
2nd/3rd  PLACE – TBA

NAISH MCHUGH AWARD FOR EMERGING FILMMAKERS
$2,500 given to the film that best captures the unique qualities of Toronto, created by an emerging filmmaker living and/or working within the Greater Toronto Area (416/905 area code). Sponsored by the City of Toronto through the TFTO.

TRINITY SQUARE VIDEO PITCH AWARD:
NEW DEADLINE: JUNE 15, 2009
Looking for production help to make your TUFF film? Send a one or two paragraph pitch that describes your 1-minute film idea. The seven submissions that best capture the spirit of this year’s TUFF themes will receive a full TSV membership and up to $600 of in-kind support towards both the production and post-production of their TUFF movie. Send your pitch with CV and contact info to: A4C@torontourbanfilmfestival.com.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBMIT YOUR FILM ONLINE: www.torontourbanfilmfestival.com

Shadow D at HarbourKIDS Festival

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Come to Toronto’s HarbourFront Centre for the HarbourKIDS Festival this Victoria Day Weekend!

The interactive artwork ShadowD
- imagined and prototyped in the CFC Media Lab 2008 -
will be installed in the famous Enwave Theatre!

Growing from the artwork “shh aah ohh”
created in the 2008 TELUS interactive Art and Entertainment Program
by Nicholas Longstaff and Rea McNamara

ShadowD puts YOU in the spotlight, and plays in ways a normal shadow could never imagine.  This delightfully devious digital shadow can do everything that you can – and MORE!

Whether young or old, short or tall, professional dancer, novice or wheelchair rider, you will love the way ShadowD make you move… for every move you make in this magical light-and-shade environment gets mimicked by your digital shadow-twin.  Soon though, your twin decides to take the lead and you discover that you can grow and shrink, twist and melt, change colour and even disappear!

You’ve never heard a shadow speak before?  Well ShadowD can, by borrowing the voice talents of renowned sound poets a.rawlings, Lillian Allen and Rob Read it sings, giggles, gulps and responds to the shapes you make on its giant screen.  You’ll be laughing along too, as kids convince parents to wiggle and shake, and to play out little scenes in light and dark for friends to watch and enjoy.

Play solo, in pairs, groups or gangs; this one-of-a-kind installation will change the way you move, expand the way you think about the dark, and light up your imagination for years to come!

EVENT DATA:
MAY  16,  17,  18 – 11:00 to 5:00
HarbourKIDS Festival 2009: Impact! at The Harbourfront Centre – Toronto
FREE events all weekend for the whole family!
235 Queens Quay West
Toronto, ON M5J 2G8
(416) 973-4000

Visit the HarbourFront Centre’s events guide at:

http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com/harbourkids/events.cfm?festival_id=29

<http://www.harbourfrontcentre.com/harbourkids/events.cfm?festival_id=29>
See MORE about ShadowD at:

http://NicholasLongstaff.ca

INTERACTIVE SCREEN @ BANFF NEW MEDIA INSTITUTE

INTERACTIVE SCREEN, Banff’s annual new media summit and workshop, is now accepting applications.  The theme this year is SUSTAIN. Oui.  The deadline is July 25.

There are two paths to the mountains:

a/ You may register as INDEPENDENT ARTISTS; the tuition is $600 and is worth it if you have it. There are many people to meet and a fine time to be had, replete with fun, learning, and the occasional wild elk or wooly mountain goat.

b/ If you have a new media project that fits within the thematic lines of the event and that you wish to further develop, you can apply for the INTENSIVE SCHOLARSHIP program. At least 10 scholarships are available. They support 50% of travel fees and 100% of tuition, room, meals, and mentorship costs. The projects will be adjudicated by a committee and participants will be invited to come to the event a day in advance and to stay on a day extra to have focussed time with Peer Advisors.

CFC Media Lab Alumnus to Exhibit Interactive Photo Montage at Nuit Blanche, Montreal

CFC Media Lab Alumnus, Genevieve Godin, is exhibiting an interactive photo montage “Dis-moi” at Nuit Blanche a Montreal on Saturday, February 27, 2010 from 9pm – 3am. This free exhibit invites the spectators to take part in the creation and the transformation of the digital images and photo montage. It will be created live and […]

BNMI Announces Upcoming Programs

The Banff New Media Institute is offering the following exciting programs: Video 2.0: Do-it-yourself videos and social media marketing Program dates: March 4 – 7, 2010 Interactive Screen 1.0: Beautiful Lives Program dates: August 14 – 21, 2010 Self-directed Co-production Residencies If interested, contact: 1-403-762-6180 or email arts_info@banffcentre.ca For more BNMI program information click here […]

World Without Water Exhibits at CODE Live

CFC Media Lab Alumni, Tahir Mahmood, Kalli Paakspuu, and Suzette Araujo exhibit “World Without Water” at VANOC’s CODE Live (Cultural Olympiad Digital Edition), a festival celebrating Canadian culture and talent into the digital sphere running February 4-21, 2010. World Without Water will be exhibited at Great Northern Way Campus (577 Great Northern Way, Vancouver) as […]

Seed Exhibits at CODE Live

CFC Media Lab Alumni, Gabe Sawhney and Napo Brousseau, along with former CFC Research and Technology Manager, Galen Scorer, exhibit “Seed” at VANOC’s CODE Live (Cultural Olympiad Digital Edition), a festival celebrating Canadian culture and talent into the digital sphere running February 4-21, 2010. Seed will be exhibited at Great Northern Way Campus (577 Great […]

Urban Screens Calls for Submissions

The exhibition I am here; what can we do? is part of “Urban Screens Toronto 2010”, an international urban screens conference and exhibition taking place between September 24th-30th; produced in collaboration with the International Urban Screens Association (IUSA). Through an integrated program of keynote lectures, panel sessions, workshops, curated screenings and multimedia projects, (Urban Screens […]

post init updates

init was lovely, interesting, engaging etc… but don’t just take my word for it: Live cinema, epic theatre I’ve meaning to get this blog written for a week, but my real job kept getting in the way. Last weekend I spend about 14 hours consuming art, or rather being consumed by it. I’m still blathering […]

*NEW* TUFF $2500 prize for emerging filmmakers, sponsored by the City of Toronto

CFC Media Lab Alumni Sharon Switzer founded this amazing film festival which continues to grow and attract a high level of talented filmmakers. TORONTO URBAN FILM FESTIVAL Silent 1-Minute Films on the TTC SUBMISSION DEADLINE: JULY 15, 2009 Trinity Square Video Pitch Deadline: June 15, 2009 Share your film with an audience of 1.3 million […]

Shadow D at HarbourKIDS Festival

Come to Toronto’s HarbourFront Centre for the HarbourKIDS Festival this Victoria Day Weekend! The interactive artwork ShadowD – imagined and prototyped in the CFC Media Lab 2008 – will be installed in the famous Enwave Theatre! Growing from the artwork “shh aah ohh” created in the 2008 TELUS interactive Art and Entertainment Program by Nicholas […]

INTERACTIVE SCREEN @ BANFF NEW MEDIA INSTITUTE

INTERACTIVE SCREEN, Banff’s annual new media summit and workshop, is now accepting applications.  The theme this year is SUSTAIN. Oui.  The deadline is July 25. There are two paths to the mountains: a/ You may register as INDEPENDENT ARTISTS; the tuition is $600 and is worth it if you have it. There are many people […]

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