All posts for Tag: toronto

Recap: ideaBOOST Master-Class and Networking Event

On Thursday, ideaBOOST held its Master Class and Networking Event at the Arts & Letters Club on Elm Street in Toronto, and featured expert insights from leading entrepreneurs in the technology space.

The interview-based Master Class included input from Sunil Sharma, Managing Director of STEM 7 Capital; Doug Cooper, Program Director for the Communitech Hyperdrive Accelerator; and Hussein Fazal, the co-founder of AdParlor (sold to Adknowledge in 2011).

Participants from the current Spring 2013 ideaBOOST Cohort and Affiliate Program were invited to attend for informal networking and the featured Master Class.

Here are some of the tips Sharma, Cooper and Fazal had for emerging startups:

“Really leveraging and accessing the mentor network – that’s important. I think the most valuable part of being in any program is the mentor network,” Sharma said. “It takes a lot of personal initiative to contact, to research the mentors, research their networks and be typically un-Canadian in their strategy of reaching out.”

According to Cooper, accountability is crucial.

“Startups need to make some real objectives that aren’t just vanity metrics like site visits, ad impressions. If you’re just trying to engage people, these metrics mean almost nothing. The key is being disciplined enough to capture a metric that isn’t easy to capture.”

“You have to keep talking to people, emailing — just keep hustling,” Fazal said. “Startups shouldn’t be afraid of being persistent and hearing ‘no’.”

See full photo coverage from the July 24 event here.

Be sure to stay tuned for updates on this exciting group of companies, as well as the ideaBOOST program.

Apply Now: ideaBOOST!

 

ideaBOOST is a business accelerator with a difference — a bootcamp for companies that want to navigate an entertainment ecosystem that has been radically disrupted by new technologies and demanding audience expectations.

We are happy to announce that the ideaBOOST application portal has opened in preparation for our second cohort. We welcome you, and any enabling-technology companies that you feel may be interested in applying to apply. Should you be interested in learning more about ideaBOOST and if the program is a good fit for your company please do not hesitate to email Leonardo Dell’Anno at ldellanno@cfccreates.com.

Additionally, feel free to visit the site to see the next set of companies applying to our program which is set to begin again on May 15. Please like, tweet, or BOOST the ones that catch your fancy.

You’re Invited: ideaBOOST Launch Pad!

We’re excited to be inviting our online community to the ideaBOOST Launch Pad.

Be sure to register online now as spaces are going fast!

TUFF is on!

The Toronto Urban Film Festival, North America’s largest commuter film festival, is ready to roll out its sixth annual edition. For 11 days, from September 7 – 17, 2012, Toronto’s subway system will become a standing-room-only cinema showcasing the world’s best one-minute, silent films to over one million viewers.

TUFF will screen 73 amazing films from 18 countries on Toronto Transit System (TTC) platform screens, and feature a new “Too TUFF for the TTC” program of online films. Films play every 10 minutes on Pattison Onestop’s 300 subway platform screens in stations across the city. Pattison Onestop will also provide designated “Film Zone” screens for commuters to watch TUFF uninterrupted on the north and south platforms of the Bloor subway station, as well as at Dundas and St. Andrew subway stations.

TUFF films can also be seen online, and viewers are encouraged to cast their vote, from September 5th to September 14th, for the Viewers’ Choice Award. The top 10 Viewers’ Choice films play on the TTC on Sunday September 16th.

 

Deconstructing Google and YouTube – Luncheon with Sabrina Geremia

Luncheon with Sabrina Geremia
Integrated Solutions Sales Leader, Google Canada

From search, to Android, to YouTube, to apps, Google is changing the way consumers access information. As content producers migrate stories to online spaces, understanding the advertising and marketing process is crucial to reaching global audiences. Sabrina will deconstruct Google’s ad and platform model and show how businesses can reach prospective consumers with the right message at the right time.

This one-hour keynote presentation is followed by Q&A, lunch and networking.

Details…

Where: Hyatt Regency, 370 King St. West.
When: Friday June 8, 11:00am – 1:00pm
More Information: http://wift.com/2012/05/deconstructing-google-and-youtube/
Register here: http://wiftspeakerseries.eventbrite.ca/?ebtv=C

Culture Days: Call for Proposals!

Culture Days is a collaborative, national volunteer movement dedicated to raising the awareness, accessibility, participation and engagement of Canadians in the arts and cultural life of their communities. From September 28 to 30, 2012, Culture Days in Mississauga will feature free, hands-on, interactive activities that invite the public to discover the world of artists, creators, historians, architects, curators and designers at work in our city. Our arts community is growing and we are happy to see and support self organized performances and artistic exhibits across the city all weekend long. In 2011, over 90 free events took place in Mississauga for Culture Days.

Take 3: Call for Proposals – Deadline May 1, 2012
Individuals and groups are invited to submit a presentation proposal for Culture Days 2012. Successful applicants will receive the guidance and support of the City’s Culture Division for their presentation.

Download additional information and the proposal form here.

Details

When: September 28 – 30, 2012
More information: www.culturedays.ca

Don’t Miss it: nextMEDIA and the Digi Awards!

As the end of November approaches we are reminded that nextMEDIA and the Digi Awards are around the corner!  We will be there and to make sure that you are able to attend the crew at nextMEDIA has decided to offer a discount for all <STABLETALK> Readers! This is one of the many perks for following us online!

nextMEDIA 2011 is poised to be the most anticipated yet!  Evolve your business alongside leading executives from advertising, publishing, media and technology for two days of strategy, networking and insights at Canada’s most influential media conference.

Some of this year’s participants include:

Also, don’t miss The Branded Entertainment keynote:

The Entertainment Marketplace: Where Buyers Meet Sellers…Yet The Price Is High

Join Robert Friedman on an informative keynote session and behind-the-scenes look at @radical.media’s global company success with well-known next generation entertainment properties. Hear from him how the development and distribution of content across multiple platforms is evolving. @radical.media has created some of the world’s most innovative content; developing, producing and distributing content for television, feature films, commercials, music programming, digital content and design including projects such as the critically acclaimed “Iconoclasts” for Sundance Channel, Emmy®-winning “10 Days That Unexpectedly Changed America” for the History Channel, “Oprah Presents Masterclass” for OWN, HBO’s “Paradise Lost”, a wide array of MTV music projects including “Lady Gaga: Inside the Outside”, “Britney: For the Record”, the Award-winning digital experience “The Wilderness Downtown” for Google Creative Lab and Arcade Fire and the the Grammy-nominated digital project “The Johnny Cash Project” with Chris Milk.


After nextMEDIA be sure to attend the Digi Awards!

We are very proud of our alumni for making it on the Digi List for this year’s Digi Awards!

Best of luck to all of you, we will be there cheering you on!

Digi Awards details…

Date: December 6 2011 at 7:00pm
Location: The Carlu
Tickets: https://registration.achillesmedia.com/delegate_registration/list_products?event_id=37 (this comes with your nextMEDIA pass)

As always, I will be live-tweeting from these two events as well as writing a wrap-up <STABLETALK> post so stay tuned!

An Open-and-Closed Case

It’s been a busy few weeks, here in Toronto.

Hot Docs and the the CFC’s own WSFF have both come and gone, bringing cosmopolitan crowds of storytellers to the city in its finest season. Subtle Technologies and Random Hacks of Kindness also wrapped up their mashings of art and science this past weekend. NXNE, just around the corner, promises an influx of cultural ideas and icons. IdeaCity murmurs sweet nothings to Toronto’s digerati of a Walt Mossberg / Margaret Atwood rap battle…

With all of these intellectual shindigs afoot; I’ve found myself thinking a great deal about the interactions between our city, the various confluences of ideas that constitute its pulse, and the technologies powerfully shaping our existence and discourse alike. As popular and academic writers delve deeper into the systems associated with innovation, collaboration, and discovery; more ideas surface that refer to our urban brains as networked, and our social networks as organisms.

Conveniently, this past Saturday I had a front-row seat at the always-fun Subtle Technologies festival for a panel discussion on the topic. CBC’s Dan Misener stirred a discussion between OCADU’s Sara Diamond, Mozilla’s Mark Surman, and BoingBoing’s Cory Doctorow; on the topic of how we might build a city that “thinks like the web.”

Back in 2006, I shot this photo of Cory and learned not to interview people in construction sites to thematically evoke open-source.

Early on, it became apparent that the conversation was going to swing “open”, widely. This shouldn’t have come as a surprise – Doctorow is a writer and curator who’s made a living (and sometime-cult vassalage) upon the spines of free books, Surman runs Mozilla as much like a research lab on open-ness as a software company, and Diamond is a multidisciplinary researcher and artist whose day-job involves elegantly catapulting Canada’s oldest and largest art school into the 21st century.

But while open source philosophy, design, and practice present a myriad of interesting processes and metaphors by which we can learn from the web in the intelligent development of our cities, some of the most interesting social disruptions of the web have been in terms of articulating the monetary value of information. Was a panel featuring three open-source advocates really the most objective approach to the topic? The argument for open source in terms of municipal (or provincial, or federal) governmental data is that information acquired through the use of taxpayer dollars is a public good. The benefits you can attain by bringing $100,000 datasets to everybody who wants them, for free, are surely significant. The UK organization mySociety has done an extensive job of rendering transparent the data and processes central to government’s operations, for example.

But as I often do at exciting multi-person panels and presentations, I found myself playing devil’s advocate.

I think Mark Surman is a great speaker, but unfortunately I have to do this for 20 minutes beforehand so I don't accidentally blurt anything.

Open source governmental data is one example of the web influencing the creation and inhabitation of cities… but what other possibilities exist? At the core of the growth of the web has been a diversity of innovative new approaches to the commercialization of information. A decade ago, few seemed to have any idea how to successfully sell and market digital music, and now the largest retailers of most media are largely digital. What lessons have we learned from micro-transaction business models for digital content that we could apply to governmental data, or statistics? What would be the downsides… and what might be the benefits?

The artistic and entrepreneurial opportunities of open data at a municipal level dominated the first half of the panel, and by the time we reached the end, I was having trouble justifying a question that trounced a few positions and case studies from the previous hour. There’s no doubt that the benefits of open-sourcing governmental data are significant, and that those benefits seem to blossom outwards as long as they themselves remain open(ish). Open data makes it easy for people to sell streetcar arrival apps (coming soon to a TTC bus near you), adopt puppies (apparently municipal datasets around humane society operations are some of the most popular in the Western world), and engage in high-tech GIS adventuring.

A poster dedicated to positive open-source citizenry and governance. Ooh-rah!

But there are benefits to a non-open approach to information (there’s got to be a better opposite for ‘open’ than closed… or locked… or bricked… argh). A few decades ago, Statistics Canada implemented a controversial new strategy – instead of classifying collected and collated information as a public good with zero strings attached, StatsCan would tie a few (strings) on and charge for some uses of that data as a significant cost recovery tactic. An interesting move, and one rather at-odds with the open source model that has emerged in the years since. Unfortunately, even at its peak the program wasn’t terribly successful – censuses are expensive – and little more than 4% of StatsCan revenue in the 1990′s came from the sales of products and services.

This image depicts the divergent ocular biology evolved by politicians to observe the world.

Tony Clement is back in the headlines this week, following up his Assault on the Longform (this will make a great science-fiction adventure movie if we can pull the wool over our kids’ eyes…) and Battle for Bandwidth with a strategy for increased user fees to offset a tax rate plateau. What might be the outcomes of a new micro-transactional approach to municipal data in a political and social climate of increased user fees? Free beer is all well and good, but it seems to me that charging for data that remains free-like-speech is also quite appealing.

What about a City App Store, where the keepers of the information can balance their (low overhead) books by selling maps of the plumbing beneath Yonge Street, or interface not only with the data but with all manner of Creative Commons-licensed visualizations thereof… I’d certainly be on board with paying for some of the city’s currently Open Data if it were packaged in a compelling experience design by some of Toronto’s best and brightest. San Francisco’s already been doing this for a few years with great uptake… if not (yet) revenues.

Open Data in this city is young, and perhaps even vulnerable to attack… Wouldn’t it make sense to create a profitable and self-sustaining office of Open Data, rather than one near-exclusively nurtured on funds subject to classification as “gravy” at a moment’s notice? Taking inspiration from GeoNames (the online database of over 7,500,000 geographical POI’s) perhaps the City could give unformatted and open-certified data away for free, while selling access to curated and contextualized data. The model of open data curation and sale is also being tweaked by SimpleGeo, a company that gives away the first 10,000 data interactions per day through a free API, but charges based on quantity above and beyond that. Do cities have the right to curate “vanilla” open data into sellable products and services? Should they?

If we’re going to design new ways for our cities and communities to work, we might as well strengthen and utilize our understanding of the technological systems that we’ve already set in motion… they may prove valuable as tools. It’s hard to imagine the wave of growth in open-source technology and uptake coming to a standstill… but it’s still worth considering how other contradictory innovations originating on the Internet and its surrounding cobwebs might well apply to the design of our cities. *

 

Trevor Haldenby is an interactive producer and photographer living in Toronto. He has attended Wilfrid Laurier University, Rhode Island School of Design, CFC Media Lab, and is presently completing a Master’s of Design in Strategic Foresight & Innovation at OCAD University.

* There’s no better place to think about this topic than at a *free* panel discussion… thanks, Subtle Technologies!

Header image from Tim Morris’ Flickr stream

 

Corus Interactive is Hiring Supervising Producer (Kids & Family)

CORUS INTERACTIVE:

Attention Alumni! Corus Interactive is seeking stellar Supervising Producer!

Corus™ Interactive (Toronto) is looking for a Supervising Producer with excellent production and managerial skills to oversee the daily operations and delivery of the Kids & Family websites and web content for YTV, Treehouse, CMT, and Nickelodeon Canada. This position reports into the Director of Interactive.

The ideal candidate will have proven experience running a team that delivers high-quality online experiences, excellent traffic metrics, innovative integrated sponsored campaigns and large-scale production budgets.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Ensure the Network websites perform optimally, function as required, and continue to deliver innovative features and functionality.
  • Maintain and grow Kids & Family websites as category traffic leaders.
  • Manage large-scale production and operations budgets, including work with Director of Interactive on forecasting and managing costs, efficiently produce or acquire excellent web content, and consistently ensure costs are on or under budget.
  • Lead production for Kids & Family Network websites and get the best performance and products out of internal and external teams.  Ensure that all websites operate with minimal downtime, bugs addressed quickly and appropriately, new features needed are identified and produced in a timely manner.
  • Understand the OIDMC tax credit system, ensure maximum number of projects qualify for tax credits, and assist in the preparation of application documentation.
  • Lead the community activities for these brands, including strategic implementation for message boards, loyalty programs, UGC and social media activities; understand all applicable regulations (e.g. PIPEDA) and legal best-practices, membership system design and flow, and organization of the moderator pool.
  • Secure and track rights for digital assets used on the sites, including contract negotiation, rights management and documentation. Oversee the implementation of all legal guidelines and processes by both internal team and external partners.
  • Lead a high-performing team of Producers, Project Managers, and coordinators.

REQUIRED SKILLS AND QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Proactive, positive, and thrives in a fast-paced highly-collaborative production environment
  • Comprehensive understanding of interactivity and the Web, website technology and production practices.
  • Passionate advocate for and consumer of interactive media for kids and parents.
  • Minimum 5 yrs professional experience in a senior production or managerial position
  • Excellent communicator and problem solver. Ability to shepherd a wide range of stakeholders with complicated brands.
  • Knowledge of information architecture, usability best practices, and demographic use patterns.
Got what it takes?

Interested applicants are invited to forward a resume by October 26, 2010 to: interactive@corusent.com

Please indicate “Supervising Producer” in your subject line or your email will not be received; no calls or faxes please.

Corus is committed to providing a fair and equitable work environment and encourages applications from qualified women, men, visible minorities, aboriginal peoples, and persons with disabilities.

For more information on Corus™ Entertainment Inc., please visit us at www.corusent.com



CFC Media Lab Alumnus Tweets Poetic Musings with Stroll City, Interactive Media-Art Project


Stroll City will appear on Onestop subway platform screens across the city every 10 minutes from September 21 – October 5.

Shawn Micallef, CFC Media Lab Alumnus and the author of Stroll: Psychogeographic Walking Tours of Toronto (as well as EYE WEEKLY columnist/Spacing editor/flâneur extraordinaire), will be tweeting his Toronto discoveries through the Twitter handle @strollcity in addition to his own feed. Torontonians are encouraged to respond to his tweets with comments and their own discoveries over the two weeks. Click here to tweet him now!

TTC riders in the city can tweet their replies to Micallef’s texts, only to see them magically appear shortly thereafter in an ever-changing spot on the Onestop Media (http://www.onestopmedia.com) TTC network of screens, visible to over 1 million subway commuters daily.

Stroll City ran in conjunction with Culture Days, a weekend long initiative (September 24 -26) dedicated to celebrating arts and culture in the city.

Culture Days applauds The Stroll City project by Art for Commuters, Onestop and Coach House Press for its unique approach to interactivity and its embrace of the Culture Days spirit…

- Aubrey Reeves, Culture Days Animator/Coordinator – Ontario Arts Council

Get ready to walk and observe! Take part in this unique, groundbreaking opportunity: a city-wide, interactive media-art project that engages with Toronto and its citizens!

Apply Now: ideaBOOST!

  ideaBOOST is a business accelerator with a difference — a bootcamp for companies that want to navigate an entertainment ecosystem that has been radically disrupted by new technologies and demanding audience expectations. We are happy to announce that the ideaBOOST application portal has opened in preparation for our second cohort. We welcome you, and any enabling-technology companies that […]

You’re Invited: ideaBOOST Launch Pad!

We’re excited to be inviting our online community to the ideaBOOST Launch Pad. Be sure to register online now as spaces are going fast!

TUFF is on!

The Toronto Urban Film Festival, North America’s largest commuter film festival, is ready to roll out its sixth annual edition. For 11 days, from September 7 – 17, 2012, Toronto’s subway system will become a standing-room-only cinema showcasing the world’s best one-minute, silent films to over one million viewers. TUFF will screen 73 amazing films from […]

Deconstructing Google and YouTube – Luncheon with Sabrina Geremia

Luncheon with Sabrina Geremia Integrated Solutions Sales Leader, Google Canada From search, to Android, to YouTube, to apps, Google is changing the way consumers access information. As content producers migrate stories to online spaces, understanding the advertising and marketing process is crucial to reaching global audiences. Sabrina will deconstruct Google’s ad and platform model and […]

Culture Days: Call for Proposals!

Culture Days is a collaborative, national volunteer movement dedicated to raising the awareness, accessibility, participation and engagement of Canadians in the arts and cultural life of their communities. From September 28 to 30, 2012, Culture Days in Mississauga will feature free, hands-on, interactive activities that invite the public to discover the world of artists, creators, […]

Don’t Miss it: nextMEDIA and the Digi Awards!

As the end of November approaches we are reminded that nextMEDIA and the Digi Awards are around the corner!  We will be there and to make sure that you are able to attend the crew at nextMEDIA has decided to offer a discount for all <STABLETALK> Readers! This is one of the many perks for […]

An Open-and-Closed Case

It’s been a busy few weeks, here in Toronto. Hot Docs and the the CFC’s own WSFF have both come and gone, bringing cosmopolitan crowds of storytellers to the city in its finest season. Subtle Technologies and Random Hacks of Kindness also wrapped up their mashings of art and science this past weekend. NXNE, just around […]

Corus Interactive is Hiring Supervising Producer (Kids & Family)

CORUS INTERACTIVE: Attention Alumni! Corus Interactive is seeking stellar Supervising Producer! Corus™ Interactive (Toronto) is looking for a Supervising Producer with excellent production and managerial skills to oversee the daily operations and delivery of the Kids & Family websites and web content for YTV, Treehouse, CMT, and Nickelodeon Canada. This position reports into the Director […]

CFC Media Lab Alumnus Tweets Poetic Musings with Stroll City, Interactive Media-Art Project

Stroll City will appear on Onestop subway platform screens across the city every 10 minutes from September 21 – October 5. Shawn Micallef, CFC Media Lab Alumnus and the author of Stroll: Psychogeographic Walking Tours of Toronto (as well as EYE WEEKLY columnist/Spacing editor/flâneur extraordinaire), will be tweeting his Toronto discoveries through the Twitter handle […]

-->